Progressive Symmetric Erythrokeratodermia

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

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It is possible that the main title of the report Progressive Symmetric Erythrokeratodermia is not the name you expected.

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Progressive symmetric erythrokeratoderma (PSEK) is a rare genetic skin disorder characterized by well-demarcated plaques of reddened, dry, and thickened skin. These lesions are distributed symmetrically on the body and tend to slowly expand and progress over time. The severity and progression of the disorder can vary greatly from one person to another, even among members of the same family. PSEK is related and can be very similar in appearance to another rare disorder called erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV).

Supporting Organizations

Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types

2616 N Broad Street
Colmar, PA 18915
Tel: (215)997-9400
Fax: (215)997-9403
Tel: (800)545-3286

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center

PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311

NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Information Clearinghouse
One AMS Circle
Bethesda, MD 20892-3675
Tel: (301)495-4484
Fax: (301)718-6366
Tel: (877)226-4267

National Registry for Ichthyosis and Related Disorders

University of Washington
Dermatology Dept. Box 356524
Seattle, WA 98195-6524
Tel: (800)595-1265

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). For a full-text version of this report, go to and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report.

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

Last Updated:  3/19/2013
Copyright  2013 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.